Pivotal Vibration Machines – Cardiotech CV9 versus Hypervibe Performance – An Update

March 26th, 2014 by Di Heap Leave a reply »

Cardiotech CV9 Pivotal Vibration Machine

 

In an older article about these two machines I wrote of the Cardiotech CV9, “The CV9 is the work-out machine. Being a new model, just onto the market this month (that was in July, 2012), it’s just a little unproven…  Cardiotech CV9 can be used for therapy/physio purposes.  This has been the main use for me” . I had a knee injury at the time and was using the CV9 for rehab to help regain movement and  strength.

hypervibe performance

 

 

 

And of the Hypervibe Performance I said, ” it’s a real work-out machine.  It really challenged me… but if you need just simple stimulation and increased circulation this machine will do that too.”

 

Now it’s time for a review and update

These two brands of high-speed, pivotal Vibration Training machines are available in Canada, U.S.A, Australia, and New Zealand (and some other countries also). Both machines are used for fitness training and/or therapy purposes and they come with an identical price tag and so which machine should you buy?

Which brand is best? Which company will provide you with the information you need for effective use? Which provides best ongoing support? What other considerations should you make?

I’ll say it now, one machine is superior – The Cardiotech CV9

Let’s have a look at each machine and at what’s provided when you buy.

Both the Hypervibe Performance and the Canadian version of CV9 (known as Complete Vibe 9) test accurate at frequencies of 6Hz to 28Hz [see notes 1 and 2] and both machines are suitable for fitness and strength training.  Both can be used for therapy, to stimulate circulation, improve balance in older or limited-mobility people, and rehabilitate after injury or illness.  Of course, you need to know how to use the machine for your intended purpose and this instruction must to be readily available in an easy to understand booklet, DVD media, or even personal training sessions. These machines are both suitable for use at home and also for therapists; beauty salons, small gyms and personal trainer studios, and even for your workplace, so knowing how to use them safely and effectively is essential. Both companies provide information.

So, why does the Cardiotech CV9, rate so much higher than the Hypervibe Performance, in my opinion?

I’ve already said both brands test true frequencies of 6Hz through 28Hz but after that so much is different. The platform of the Cardiotech CV9 is 72% larger than the Hypervibe Performance. And the CV9’s platform is accessible on all sides with the control panel column located on one corner of the machine rather than attached to the centre back of the platform.  This design removes restriction on the poses or type of exercises and that can be performed. In regular use  the CV9 is more durable and more stable than the Hypervibe Performance. Interestingly though, despite the CV9’s platform being much larger both machines have the approximately the same dimensions.

The CV9 was designed on the “shop floor” specifically taking into account its intended use – fit for the purpose.  The Hypervibe Performance is the same vibration machine that several brands sell but is modified during manufacture to improve it’s stability and performance at higher speeds for fitness training .

The Hypervibe Performance machine has a slightly higher amplitude, 11mm and higher G-force and this is used as a selling point for this brand.  The designers of the CV9 chose to stay with 10mm, the same as the original German machine that these machines are based apon.  With the large, accessible platform of the CV9, a 10mm amplitude and slightly lower G-force was found to give the user a comfortable, stable experience. The Canadian version of the CV9, the Complete Vibe 9,  has another feature to provide for user comfort, called “weight adjusted sensitivity” [see notes 1 and 2].  If the machine senses a move in the user’s position on the machine, such as a change in foot movement, it slows down for just a few seconds reducing the force that’s going to the user’s joints. The first time this happens the person might wonder if the machine has a fault so it’s important to know why this short slow down has occurred. If you are looking to buy a machine its also good to know that both are able to take high user weight, of up to 180Kg.

The materials the machines are made of differ, with the Cardiotech CV9 made with a high tensile steel frame wrapped in a gloss plastic finish. The Hypervibe is made of a mild steel with some plastic. It has been strengthened to differentiate it from other machines that come off the same mold.

Hypervibe Control Panel

Hypervibe Performance Control Panel

The control panels on the machines look very different; the Cardiotech has a smooth touch panel with choices of program plus manual control. It also has a remote control unit for use when the control panel is out of reach such as when kneeling for arm positions. The Hypervibe has a push button choice of program with an LCD display.

 

The most useful difference about the control panel is that the Cardiotech CV9 has an 8 second countdown before the machine starts.

CV9 Control Panel

Cardiotech CV9 Control Panel

This gives the user an 8 second time frame to get into perfect position on the platform before the machine motion starts. And it makes the little remote control unit superfluous so if the kids or dog run off with it or it’s confused with the TV remote and lost down the back of the couch, no worries!

A very important point is the after-sales support provided. When buying a Vibration Machine I’ve seen this range from giving some basic essentials about how to use the machine while you are still in the showroom through to supplying a fully guided program, printed instructions and pictures and/or DVD’s.  Even better is having one-on-one contact with someone who will give you information and guidance specific to your individual needs and desired results.  Sales talk is all very well; knowing who to contact after your machine arrives and you are starting to use it and need help, that’s what’s important. And what if the machine develops a fault, how do you go about getting it fixed? Will the company still be in business and does your warranty have any real worth?

Both companies promise good backup. Cardiotech, the larger company also has an association with other vibration training companies who would guide the enquirer and would “go to bat” for them in the unlikely event a warranty request was overlooked. With Hypervibe I see that there’s an email address for contact.

Hypervibe’s online product info states that they provide a User Guide, interactive CD, 2 years warranty, and 1 year physiotherapist support. They also sell for $99, a DVD course about vibration training. I wonder what you get from the DVD that is more than the freely provided training and if the information is necessary you shouldn’t have to pay extra for it, in my opinion. Cardiotech provides a 2 year labour and parts warranty, a CV9 specific comprehensive “strength and toning” user guide developed by Lloyd Shaw and endorsed by the International Vibration Training Regulatory Board (I.V.T.R.B), the same program used by commercial studios worldwide, also ongoing email support and lifetime membership to VibrationExercise.com where articles and training guides written by Dr. Jasper Sidhu can assist you with any therapy needs and teach you about vibration training in general.

In Conclusion

CV9 pict

Cardiotech CV9 – Complete Vibe 9 – Premium Speed Vibration Machine

I totally recommend the Cardiotech CV9. In my opinion this machine is fully superior in design and performance. And it’s commercial quality yet designed to look good in your home. The after sales  back-up is there, readily available for your current and future needs. And the point I made almost two years about it being “new and being a little unproven” – that’s fully negated. The CV9 I have in the studio here has performed without fault.  I know that around 5000 units have been sold and I’ve heard nothing of any design or manufacturing problems.

 

Another point, about the companies providing these machines. As I’ve been involved in this industry almost a decade now, I know and hear a lot, the good and the bad. I support the use of all types of vibration machines and I want people to learn about them and find out what type or brand is most suitable for their needs. One thing that doesn’t go down well with me and with consumers in general is when a company uses scare mongering tactics to create fear and confusion among potential buyers and clients. This is an activity Hypervibe has engaged in by giving strong warnings on its website against lineal machines. Warnings that, just a few years ago,  involved quoting a horrible, out-dated, academic study where monkeys were deliberately tortured by being strapped to a vibrating platform for up to 30 hours. This action would kill any living organism!  The accompanying picture showed a woman with a pained look on her face, her hands holding the sides of her head. Obviously this is not the controlled whole body vibration as used for workouts and/or therapy but Hypervibe used this old study and it’s sad results to suggest that brain damage or even death possibly awaited users of lineal vibration, the machines such as ones I work with every day. Pushing this nonsense, obviously in attempt to gain sales of their own brand, their action was detrimental to the entire industry, scaring people away from all vibration machines and all the good training and therapy that can be achieved with their use. Its taken a lot of education and informative articles to counter this nonsense.

For information about the Cardiotech CV9:  http://www.cardiotech.com.au/cv9/cv9-features
 
Notes:
 
1. The Cardiotech CV9 is, at the date of this article, available in two versions, with slightly differing specs. The Canadian version, known as CompleteVibe 9, has a true frequency 6Hz through 28Hz .  The Australasian version, known as CV9 has a frequency limit of 22Hz which gives the user excellent pose control (ability to maintain their position on the machine, often a squat, without feet slipping which can happen to all but the most experienced user). The Australasian version, CV9 can be built to allow the higher frequency if a buyer requests this. Conversely the Canadian model, Complete Vibe 9, can be set to the lower speed, each use is instantly programmable on the touch screen.

2.  The Canadian CompleteVibe 9 model currently has the “weight adjusted sensitivity” feature. This will soon come standard on both versions. The small “comfort” features help set the Cardiotech High-Speed Vibration machine apart from all others for strength workouts, giving it a comfortable feel alongside an intensity of muscle contraction that is matched only by commercial lineal machines.

3. My previous article that I’ve quoted from: “Two High-Speed Pivotal Vibration Machines Recommended for Home Users”

Very Important Note: I do not sell any brands of Vibration Machine. Also I do not receive commission for sales or sales recommendations. It is essential to match the buyers needs and circumstances to the right machine and so I recommend whatever machine is right for the person, from little massage/therapy pads, smal,l pivotal, therapy machines, high-speed pivotal for training (and or therapy), through to telling the enquirer that supervised training in a specialised studio or gym is the best option for them.

 

 

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1 comment

  1. Lloyd Shaw says:

    I am still very disappointed at HyperVibes many questionable sales tactics. It is almost as though they are pathological in this respect.

    I think it reaks of desperation and will come back to bite them.

    I like the fact the CV9 has tried to address previous old design / safety limitation + an easily to follow program. While other companies seem content to just copy a 40 year old design and give you pictures of 100 mainly useless poses .

    They are also moving away from promoting people wind the machine up to full speed and just stand there for 10 mins looking like a zombie on speed.

    I respect progress.