Archive for the ‘Marketing’ category

Pivotal Vibration Machines – Cardiotech CV9 versus Hypervibe Performance – An Update

March 26th, 2014

Cardiotech CV9 Pivotal Vibration Machine

 

In an older article about these two machines I wrote of the Cardiotech CV9, “The CV9 is the work-out machine. Being a new model, just onto the market this month (that was in July, 2012), it’s just a little unproven…  Cardiotech CV9 can be used for therapy/physio purposes.  This has been the main use for me” . I had a knee injury at the time and was using the CV9 for rehab to help regain movement and  strength.

hypervibe performance

 

 

 

And of the Hypervibe Performance I said, ” it’s a real work-out machine.  It really challenged me… but if you need just simple stimulation and increased circulation this machine will do that too.”

 

Now it’s time for a review and update

These two brands of high-speed, pivotal Vibration Training machines are available in Canada, U.S.A, Australia, and New Zealand (and some other countries also). Both machines are used for fitness training and/or therapy purposes and they come with an identical price tag and so which machine should you buy?

Which brand is best? Which company will provide you with the information you need for effective use? Which provides best ongoing support? What other considerations should you make?

I’ll say it now, one machine is superior – The Cardiotech CV9

Let’s have a look at each machine and at what’s provided when you buy.

Both the Hypervibe Performance and the Canadian version of CV9 (known as Complete Vibe 9) test accurate at frequencies of 6Hz to 28Hz [see notes 1 and 2] and both machines are suitable for fitness and strength training.  Both can be used for therapy, to stimulate circulation, improve balance in older or limited-mobility people, and rehabilitate after injury or illness.  Of course, you need to know how to use the machine for your intended purpose and this instruction must to be readily available in an easy to understand booklet, DVD media, or even personal training sessions. These machines are both suitable for use at home and also for therapists; beauty salons, small gyms and personal trainer studios, and even for your workplace, so knowing how to use them safely and effectively is essential. Both companies provide information.

So, why does the Cardiotech CV9, rate so much higher than the Hypervibe Performance, in my opinion?

I’ve already said both brands test true frequencies of 6Hz through 28Hz but after that so much is different. The platform of the Cardiotech CV9 is 72% larger than the Hypervibe Performance. And the CV9’s platform is accessible on all sides with the control panel column located on one corner of the machine rather than attached to the centre back of the platform.  This design removes restriction on the poses or type of exercises and that can be performed. In regular use  the CV9 is more durable and more stable than the Hypervibe Performance. Interestingly though, despite the CV9’s platform being much larger both machines have the approximately the same dimensions.

The CV9 was designed on the “shop floor” specifically taking into account its intended use – fit for the purpose.  The Hypervibe Performance is the same vibration machine that several brands sell but is modified during manufacture to improve it’s stability and performance at higher speeds for fitness training .

The Hypervibe Performance machine has a slightly higher amplitude, 11mm and higher G-force and this is used as a selling point for this brand.  The designers of the CV9 chose to stay with 10mm, the same as the original German machine that these machines are based apon.  With the large, accessible platform of the CV9, a 10mm amplitude and slightly lower G-force was found to give the user a comfortable, stable experience. The Canadian version of the CV9, the Complete Vibe 9,  has another feature to provide for user comfort, called “weight adjusted sensitivity” [see notes 1 and 2].  If the machine senses a move in the user’s position on the machine, such as a change in foot movement, it slows down for just a few seconds reducing the force that’s going to the user’s joints. The first time this happens the person might wonder if the machine has a fault so it’s important to know why this short slow down has occurred. If you are looking to buy a machine its also good to know that both are able to take high user weight, of up to 180Kg.

The materials the machines are made of differ, with the Cardiotech CV9 made with a high tensile steel frame wrapped in a gloss plastic finish. The Hypervibe is made of a mild steel with some plastic. It has been strengthened to differentiate it from other machines that come off the same mold.

Hypervibe Control Panel

Hypervibe Performance Control Panel

The control panels on the machines look very different; the Cardiotech has a smooth touch panel with choices of program plus manual control. It also has a remote control unit for use when the control panel is out of reach such as when kneeling for arm positions. The Hypervibe has a push button choice of program with an LCD display.

 

The most useful difference about the control panel is that the Cardiotech CV9 has an 8 second countdown before the machine starts.

CV9 Control Panel

Cardiotech CV9 Control Panel

This gives the user an 8 second time frame to get into perfect position on the platform before the machine motion starts. And it makes the little remote control unit superfluous so if the kids or dog run off with it or it’s confused with the TV remote and lost down the back of the couch, no worries!

A very important point is the after-sales support provided. When buying a Vibration Machine I’ve seen this range from giving some basic essentials about how to use the machine while you are still in the showroom through to supplying a fully guided program, printed instructions and pictures and/or DVD’s.  Even better is having one-on-one contact with someone who will give you information and guidance specific to your individual needs and desired results.  Sales talk is all very well; knowing who to contact after your machine arrives and you are starting to use it and need help, that’s what’s important. And what if the machine develops a fault, how do you go about getting it fixed? Will the company still be in business and does your warranty have any real worth?

Both companies promise good backup. Cardiotech, the larger company also has an association with other vibration training companies who would guide the enquirer and would “go to bat” for them in the unlikely event a warranty request was overlooked. With Hypervibe I see that there’s an email address for contact.

Hypervibe’s online product info states that they provide a User Guide, interactive CD, 2 years warranty, and 1 year physiotherapist support. They also sell for $99, a DVD course about vibration training. I wonder what you get from the DVD that is more than the freely provided training and if the information is necessary you shouldn’t have to pay extra for it, in my opinion. Cardiotech provides a 2 year labour and parts warranty, a CV9 specific comprehensive “strength and toning” user guide developed by Lloyd Shaw and endorsed by the International Vibration Training Regulatory Board (I.V.T.R.B), the same program used by commercial studios worldwide, also ongoing email support and lifetime membership to VibrationExercise.com where articles and training guides written by Dr. Jasper Sidhu can assist you with any therapy needs and teach you about vibration training in general.

In Conclusion

CV9 pict

Cardiotech CV9 – Complete Vibe 9 – Premium Speed Vibration Machine

I totally recommend the Cardiotech CV9. In my opinion this machine is fully superior in design and performance. And it’s commercial quality yet designed to look good in your home. The after sales  back-up is there, readily available for your current and future needs. And the point I made almost two years about it being “new and being a little unproven” – that’s fully negated. The CV9 I have in the studio here has performed without fault.  I know that around 5000 units have been sold and I’ve heard nothing of any design or manufacturing problems.

 

Another point, about the companies providing these machines. As I’ve been involved in this industry almost a decade now, I know and hear a lot, the good and the bad. I support the use of all types of vibration machines and I want people to learn about them and find out what type or brand is most suitable for their needs. One thing that doesn’t go down well with me and with consumers in general is when a company uses scare mongering tactics to create fear and confusion among potential buyers and clients. This is an activity Hypervibe has engaged in by giving strong warnings on its website against lineal machines. Warnings that, just a few years ago,  involved quoting a horrible, out-dated, academic study where monkeys were deliberately tortured by being strapped to a vibrating platform for up to 30 hours. This action would kill any living organism!  The accompanying picture showed a woman with a pained look on her face, her hands holding the sides of her head. Obviously this is not the controlled whole body vibration as used for workouts and/or therapy but Hypervibe used this old study and it’s sad results to suggest that brain damage or even death possibly awaited users of lineal vibration, the machines such as ones I work with every day. Pushing this nonsense, obviously in attempt to gain sales of their own brand, their action was detrimental to the entire industry, scaring people away from all vibration machines and all the good training and therapy that can be achieved with their use. Its taken a lot of education and informative articles to counter this nonsense.

For information about the Cardiotech CV9:  http://www.cardiotech.com.au/cv9/cv9-features
 
Notes:
 
1. The Cardiotech CV9 is, at the date of this article, available in two versions, with slightly differing specs. The Canadian version, known as CompleteVibe 9, has a true frequency 6Hz through 28Hz .  The Australasian version, known as CV9 has a frequency limit of 22Hz which gives the user excellent pose control (ability to maintain their position on the machine, often a squat, without feet slipping which can happen to all but the most experienced user). The Australasian version, CV9 can be built to allow the higher frequency if a buyer requests this. Conversely the Canadian model, Complete Vibe 9, can be set to the lower speed, each use is instantly programmable on the touch screen.

2.  The Canadian CompleteVibe 9 model currently has the “weight adjusted sensitivity” feature. This will soon come standard on both versions. The small “comfort” features help set the Cardiotech High-Speed Vibration machine apart from all others for strength workouts, giving it a comfortable feel alongside an intensity of muscle contraction that is matched only by commercial lineal machines.

3. My previous article that I’ve quoted from: “Two High-Speed Pivotal Vibration Machines Recommended for Home Users”

Very Important Note: I do not sell any brands of Vibration Machine. Also I do not receive commission for sales or sales recommendations. It is essential to match the buyers needs and circumstances to the right machine and so I recommend whatever machine is right for the person, from little massage/therapy pads, smal,l pivotal, therapy machines, high-speed pivotal for training (and or therapy), through to telling the enquirer that supervised training in a specialised studio or gym is the best option for them.

 

 

2013 – Vibration Training and my Trade Mark

January 18th, 2013

This new year has started with a lot of bang and bright lights and I don’t mean the New Year’s eve fireworks.

The Vibra-Train studio is busy and I’m enjoying seeing customers back after summer holidays and many new people also. I’ve said how excited I was about the year ahead and some people smiled knowingly. I was told it meant more “hard work”, more of the same but with agreement that it is exciting for we who are passionate to see vibration training  known and accepted as an effective training method for fitness and exercise and what’s more, its a method that, when used with correct instruction, is valid for people who are less abled, maybe  because of age, injury, or disability.

 

VibePlus Logo

 

Alongside my work as a trainer I’m also busy with my other vibration training business involvements – About this, some readers will notice I took down my last writing, the one about my New Zealand trademark, VibePlus, being “challenged”.   » Read more: 2013 – Vibration Training and my Trade Mark

Vibration Machines – watching you wobble yourself slim?

September 2nd, 2011

Have you ever watched an advertorial or a youtube video showing a woman on a pivotal vibration machine and laughed as you watched their butt and legs wobble about from the side to side motion of the machine?

Crazy Fit Massage Machine

Low Speed Pivotal Massage Machine

I have three pivotal machines in the  studio where I work.  Two are used for therapy poses to increase blood circulation, help with relaxation, and improve proprioception in customers who because of medical or physical disability are not yet able to use the lineal Vibra-Train machines.

high speed pivotal

Premium Speed Pivotal Workout Machine

One machine is larger and is a true workout model. It’s used mainly for physio/therapy use also but can be used for full workouts. We find out customers here, when given the choice, prefer the lineal Vibra-Train platforms.

There’s also the embarrasment factor of the pivotal machines when used in a semi or deeper squat poses – the action of the side to side motion causes the user’s butt and thighs to wobble noticeably; also in some people their hips show  movement also. This is all totally normal when using this type of machine but, oh boy, does it look funny. You might have seen it in internet videos and on television where it looks amusing when the model on the machines is a tiny size 6 or 8 (N.Z. size) but can you imagine the look when a 250lb (120kg) women uses the machine? I’m asuming of course that the machine copes with this larger sized person – many pivotal machines degrade in performance well below that weight.  Even a regular sized woman, say 140lbs, doesn’t look good wobbling away on the pivotal machines. But, of course, the advertisers use attractive, tiny models to promote their products.

Jumping to their defense – vibration training isn’t about looking good in the studio while doing your work-out, it simply doesn’t matter, but the wobble is not a good look!

Another defense of the “wobble”, though completely wrong this one – I’ve had people say, “oh look at their butts wobble. They MUST be losing lots of weight!” Others come into the studio and ask if our machines are like the ones they’ve seen on TV, the ones where you wobble and get slim and fit.

Is it true – can you lightly wobble your way to a new slender you? Technically any movement burns more calories than sitting still so the person on the pivotal machine is getting some benefit from it. Many “weight-loss” books tell us to move about a lot, move legs about when sitting at the office desk and fidgit with your hands. By doing this you burn a few more calories each day and a small, measurable amount in a year. Okay, its better than being sedentary but it does very little toward the goal of  fat reduction and fitness. I’m amazed by the number of people who are confused by this.

To demonstrate the difference in machine types I put the questioning customer onto the large pivotal machine for a one minute semi-squat at low speed. Then they do the same position at a higher speed, again for a minute or two. You can see their thighs wobble and they feel this as a gentle activation. Those who want to can do the squat pose at high speed; 22hz is about the top before the users feet begin to slip on the (non-slip) plate. I then invite them to rest and then repeat the squat once or twice on a lineal machine, using the basic level 2 beginners unit. This machine gives a strong muscle contraction in the quads (front upper leg) when the person does a simple, deep (110 degree) squat for just 60 seconds.  That’s all it takes to show the very major difference in the machine types. Watching the person on the lineal machine they appear not to be moving at all, there’s none of the “wobble” but, in their own words, they tell me how much harder it is and how much deeper they feel the muscle contraction.

It’s not possible to wobble yourself slim using a pivotal vibration machine. It might be a way to start out but its not going to work for long. Wobbling fat – wobbles fat, it might give some benefit as it will mobilise fluid and improve lymphatic drainage but real toning comes from real training – and that’s impossible on almost all pivotal machines.

I’m reminded of the slogan we use when customers complain that the training program is hard work; we tell them the sign over the door says “Vibra-TRAIN” not “Vibra-MASSAGE”

Even worse than believing that by using a low speed pivotal vibration machine, you can lose weight, tone, get fit and look like the model on the advertorial on TV or internet is the promotion of simply standing upright on the machine while you watch TV.  I read an advert this week, an auction on New Zealand’s TradeMe site, where a low speed pivotal machine was being sold with the instruction to simply stand or sit on the machine and watch the pounds slip away.
IF ONLY IT WAS THAT EASY!
Only the lasiest of consumers would believe that – and as I’ve written before, they seem destined to be ripped off but that sort of marketing does a lot of harm to the whole vibration training industry.

Glossary:

Lineal
A solid platform that moves straight up and down, all across the surface at the same time.

Pivotal
A Platform that tilts from side to side , so one foot goes up , while the other goes down.

Buying a cheap Vibration Machine almost guarantees you a move overseas

June 21st, 2011

plane travelling awayI’m joking of course but here’s the serious part – each day I check out the vibration machine auctions on New Zealand’s TradeMe website and I see a trend emerging; many sellers of cheaper machines like the low speed pivotal ones (Crazyfit, Skydancer, SiTrek etc) and the small lineal DKN are selling their machines because they are moving overseas.  I check out their other listings to see if they are selling anything I might be interested in but, to my surprise, their only auction is the vibration machine.

Other sellers list their low quality machine with glowing reference to how much weight they’ve lost or how amazing their fitness is now, after using their machine for the past three months. In fact they are now so fit now they are selling it on so that you can get these same incredible results – they don’t need it anymore. I wonder what happens two to four weeks after they stop using the machine. Don’t they realise fitness training must be continued every week, every year, to keep the benefits and not become deconditioned?

These claims are, in my opinion, totally fictitious and could be laughable except for the real truth – that truth is that many of the sellers were ripped off and bought a cheap, or not so cheap in the case of Gymform VibroMax, low quality machine (usually based on claims of health, fitness and even beauty) and now they are fobbing it off onto you, the potential buyer.

I don’t think the sellers on TradeMe deliberately set out to lie about their home machine, well not the everyday people just selling a machine they no longer use, they just advertise it with the same sort of wording that attracted them when they first bought the machine.  They want it gone, fast and for as much money as possible especially if it cost them quite a lot. Also, home vibration machines are the size of an armchair so they can be really taking up space; annoyingly if they aren’t being used.

Buyer Beware! Before you buy a secondhand machine ask the seller the real reason why they are selling it.  And even more importantly do some research into the varying brands and types of machines available.  Vibration Machines are very effective for fitness and strength, for fat-loss, and for helping the body to relax and repair in the case of those with injuries or conditions that require simple blood circulation improvement and gentle muscle stimulation.  Make sure what you are buying is the right product for your needs.

A visit to a vibration training studio can be really helpful also. You will learn how to use a machine safely and correctly and maybe you’ll decide a studio with supervised training is a better option, if there’s one you can get to of course.

Meeting a Low Speed Pivotal Vibration Machine Salesman who wanted to be educated

June 19th, 2011

I started writing this article on a flight; returning from an extended weekend in Sydney, Australia visiting my son.  We went to several large shopping malls and indulged in lots of shopping as it was Sales time.

Taking a train to Parramatta, an hour trip out of Central Sydney I’d barely begun my degradation into sales mode when I saw a stand in the walkway with a guy selling exercise equipment.  My son, Brad, pointed out a vibration machine so I walked over to see what type it was.  The salesman asked me if I was interested and had I used one before.  He was a really nice guy so I wasn’t going to let him do a sales talk, I told him right away that I worked as an instructor with high energy lineal machines.  He actually seemed relieved and asked me to tell him about them as he’d only recently learnt that there were others than the type he was selling.

We talked for about an hour, a time really well spent as this salesman who could have insisted his machine did everything that anyone could want or need, instead wanted to be educated.  He even asked about the machine he was selling which was a home machine, quite expensive (but aren’t they all). It was a low speed pivotal (side to side motion) and definitely not the worst I’ve trialled.  The sales guy said he was using the machine at home and wanted to know how to use it effectively to get the best results possible. He could see the possibilities of Vibration Training for fitness and weight-loss but no one had even told him how to use the machines he was supposed to be selling.

The salesman was a bit overweight so I first pointed out that the machine was barely coping and he’d do better on a higher quality machine.  We then went on to talk about poses that can be used. (there was a poster on the wall with about 30 positions many of which were a bit like yoga and totally impossible and impractical for either me or the guy to attempt).  I went through the IVTRB Safety program with him, using the pivotal version and we discussed the speeds/frequencies to set the machine for each pose.  I was able to actively demonstrate most of them.

We then used my son’s large screen cellphone to watch the YouTube video of Lloyd Shaw’s work-out – again it’s the IVTRB Safety Program but with a few extra poses, using the Vibra-Train lineal machine with side vibrating handlebars. David, the sales guy, was getting excited and then watching the Full Body Triceps Dip position using side handlebars he realised there was no way to translate this to anything that could be done on his machine.  He now wants a Vibra-Train brand Lineal machine.  We even had a talk about how Vibra-Train now lease machines for commercial use.  I really felt a little sorry for him – he saw what was possible and now he wants it and I’m sure he went home that night to talk to his wife about a trip to Auckland to try out the whole program.

I continued with my shopping but I’d lost interest; instead I was “buzzing”, excited that I’d been able to help someone learn a little more about vibration machines and how to use them. And very happy to have met a salesman who, instead of pretending he already “knew it all” wanted to extend his knowledge.

Commercial Vibration Training Machines

July 7th, 2010

If you are a gym owner wanting to buy or lease a Vibration Training Machine for your clients to use, what machine type and specifications should you be looking for?

Or perhaps you own or run a Vibration Training Studio or you’re interested in getting into this industry – You want your clients to get great results but there are so many choices of machine brands, type, price and quality, so what should you demand from the company you choose to supply your machines?

Watch this Video,

What to look for in a Commercial Vibration Training Platform”


Unethical TradeMe Seller reacts to the truth

May 31st, 2010

A week ago I wrote a series of articles about sellers of Vibration Machines on TradeMe, a New Zealand online auction site, similar to Ebay.  I wrote about fitness product importers who sold new machines, usually low energy, pivotal vibration massage units and also about regular re-sellers of used machines.

One of the sellers of low energy, cheap to manufacture, machines has banned me. That means I can’t ask any questions on his auctions or give any reply when he misleads potential buyers by his auction wording or in replies to questions asked.

This seller trades on TradeMe as Fitness Hire Ltd or razzel1 and they use the brand name SiTrek Vibration Trainer. They say its one of the most sold vibration machines in the world.  This is true, it’s the well know, CrazyFit Massager. Read a little about them: Click here

Crazy Fit Massage MachineI wrote of how this auction seller of new cheaply made, low energy, pivotal machines advertised them in a manner that made them sound equal to high force Studio platforms and even said, ” don’t waste your money going to a studio”.  They say that for benefits equal to working out for an hour at the gym all you need to do is STAND on the machine while you watch TV or listen to music”.  Then you’ll get increased circulation (that’s partially true), increased metabolism and burn more calories both during your time on the machine and after. Well that last part is a big stretch, I can’t say it’s totally untrue but really? increased metabolism after standing (that’s standing not performing any exercise positions) on a machine that moves you up and down, slightly see-saw style about 12 times a second? Maybe if you weigh over 400 pounds it might be a helpful start to movement.

I’ve tried it!  On one machine I got bored, on another that had faster and very random sideways movement as well and the see-saw up/down I got sea-sick.  To someone unaccustomed to exercise or vibration machines It can feel, well, like movement, so it is possible to get a good sensation and a belief that, yes, this machine is going to make you fit and strong. This is how so many people are happy enough to buy this type of machine.

It really can feel exciting. After all, it was one of these low energy pivotal machines that I first tried and decided it was, 1. dangerous (it was a bigger, faster, uncontrolled movement, pivotal machine), 2. soothing to painful shoulders when I knelt and put my hands on the platform so I pondered its value for massage and healing, 3. exciting enough to make me investigate more about other uses opf Vibration and other types of machines.  I thought it had “potential” but that, something was very wrong with the design of the machine I tried.

The rest is, as they say, history! I am now one of the most prolific advocates for high quality Vibration Training and Vibration Therapy.  I’ve seen what it can do and the proven benefits in my life and so many others.  I’ve written many published articles and debated with people worldwide on the topics of machine types, quality, benefits and more.

There’s no way I am going to stand aside and watch as unethical traders use whatever advertising words they choose and attach the benefits of high energy, high quality machines to the auction details for their plastic, low everything, machines.  I’ve said many times that some of these low force, pivotal machines can have benefits for some people; massage value to the legs, slightly increased circulation and very slightly increased metabolism in overweight, very unfit or unwell, or those who do no exercise at all.  The degree of benefit depends mostly on the machine but also on the needs of the user. 

There is no way a person can build muscle and get the physiche of the people shown on infomercials or in pictures attached to these machines just by standing on one, ten minutes a day, or even by following the supplied exercise chart.  Heck, I couldn’t even get into some of the yoga style poses that are shown on some of the exercise charts but I’ll grant that performing the poses on or off the cheap, low energy pivotal machine might increase one’s flexibility (and you don’t need the machine for that).

I’ll continue to warn about the rip-off’s of the Vibration Training Industry and equally importantly, I’ll continue to promote the use and benefits of good quality machines, of varying brands and types. Banning me from questioning an auction’s details gives me greater reason to suspect the seller of being knowingly dishonest and unethical and I’ll yell loudly against that every time.

Note: This blog post is my personal opinion. All buyers of Vibration Machines by auction, in stores, from or as-seen-on-tv sellers are advised to seek advice, use Google, and make their own educated decisions.

Unethical and Blatently Dishonest Retailers

May 21st, 2010

An online auction  for a Vibration Machine reads: “DON’T WASTE YOUR MONEY GOING TO VIBRATION CLINICS when you can now do it at in the comfort of your own home…you can trust you are about to get a GREAT MACHINE with service to match . ONE OF MOST SOLD VIBRATION TRAINERS IN THE WORLD SITREK Vibration trainer” (It’s a Crazyfit machine repackaged with a new label)

It goes on to say “Just 10 minutes on the SFT can equal up to 1 hour of exercise… Reduces unwanted fat on the hips, waist and abdomen… Improves muscle tone and flexibility” and more

Other sellers suggest that their machine is equal to the ones in Vibration Studios and they quote academic study results from larger, higher force machines, often ones that have a completely different mode of action; studies from lineal (upright vibration) machines are frequently attached to low cost, low energy pivotal (see-saw action) machines.

Specifications are very often incorrectly stated, copied from the manufacturer’s papers which are in poorly translated English and confusing, but that, in my opinion, is no excuse for stating obviously incorrect figures.  Online retailers frequently state that a small, home model pivotal Vibration Therapy machine runs at 50Hz, that it vibrates 50 times a second or that it has 50 speed levels. This is blatently incorrect and if they thought about it for even a minute they would realise that the 50Hz relates to the power supply to the machine which in New Zealand is at 50Hz.  Some  even state alongside the 50 speed levels that it vibrates at 5-20Hz or similar.  I’m left wondering how they can state two conflicting figures alongside each other.

Then there’s one online New Zealand retailer that adds a disclaimer to his TradeMe auctions: IMPORTANT – we do not accept returns if you have simply changed your mind on this item or the item does not meet your expectation of what you orginally thought.

Retail Stores, such as fitness equipment stores, often advertise using the same incorrect specs and wording.  I’ve gone to stores and asked questions about machines and got responses telling me how amazing the (very low force and quality) machines are and how I will get fit, lose weight, gain muscle and become almost super-human in no time at all if I buy this machine.

I’ve written previously about T.V. advertorials – the same misinformation  is presented, along with testimonials; sometimes from people we recognise and thought we could trust.

It’s very much a matter of: Buyer Beware!

Selling Vibration Machines – So many dishonest re-sellers

May 19th, 2010

I’ve been thinking over my last post and also told a few people what I’d written.  Their replies tell me I have been too kind, too polite in what I’ve written.

Talking about buyers the comments have included:

  • So many people buy low energy home Vibration Machines thinking they are going to get really fit and strong, lose weight, gain muscle and get the look of a model, all by standing on the jiggly machine 10 minutes a day.
  • Lazy people wanting a quick fix believe what the infomercials that tell them, that no effort is required, just stand on the machine while watching T.V.  it’s so easy.  They are so gulliable that they believe that the model or personal trainer shown in the infomercial got to look so good just because they use that machine.
  • Some people do try harder to buy a machine that will give them results.  They might even get some benefit from their machine at first because they follow a program carefully but only a few weeks later they plateau and stop making gains.

Then what do these people do when they realise their cheap (or sometimes not so cheap), low quality machines are not going to give them the results they’d hoped for?

Many, and I’m tempted to say Most, sell them on – using the same dishonest advertising that tempted them to buy in the first place.  By this time they know it’s not the truth but hey, they were conned or maybe too lazy to really check out what they were buying, and now they want as much of their money back as possible.

I can’t understand how people can do this;  how so many can lie so easily.  Maybe online auctions make the whole sales process seem remote and selling to someone you don’t know somehow lets people feel okay about being dishonest but really, if you have been conned, how can you turn around so easily and con someone else?

And to the question: have I ever bought or sold a Vibration Machine on an online auction site?

Yes, I have. I bought a small DKN lineal vibration machine when I was learning about machine types and force. I wanted to see how well it worked for home use and just what could be achieved with it.  I knew what I was buying and only paid $NZ150, a reasonable price.  The seller was honest in the auction saying it had been bought for her father but as he was a fit, muscular man who enjoyed sailing; the machine was simply too low powered and also the platform was too small for him so they had bought a much larger medium force machine.  They warned me that the machine was low force.

I played with the little DKN machine for a few months putting myself, family and friends through the Vibra-Train safety program; as much as one can do with such a small, low to the ground machine.  I even bought a foam mat to use on the platform when hands or elbows were in contact with the spikey surface.  The machine had very limited use for my famly as we use Vibra-Train machines in the studio so we soon tired with it.  It’s only real use was for my husband to warm up before going for a 10 mile winter run and for this he found it okay.  So I on-sold it, again on an internet auction site, with honest wording, of course and I showed the buyer how to use it.  It was adequate for the buyer’s needs; useful  for gentle muscle stimulation and increased blood supply.

And, it’s really not so hard to be honest.

Vibration Machines for Sale on TradeMe

May 19th, 2010

I often look at the auctions for Vibration Machines for sale on TradeMe, New Zealand’s popular auction site for new and re-sale items – It’s similar to Ebay.

There’s a question/comment field and at times I use this to educate and correct sellers on the specifications and uses of the machine they are trying to sell as there’s so much misinformation.  Gymform Vibromax Pivotal Vibration Machine

Cheap, low energy pivotal (teeter-totter/see-saw) machines are frequently listed as “amazing workout, builds muscle, lose weight. The same machines as in studios, just smaller”.  This is, of course, not true and those machines are Vibration Therapy machines useful for helping increase blood circulation and helping free up movement, depending on the actual machine – some are only useful to use the arms as a clothes hanger, not really much use at all.

 Vibe Trainer Whole Body Vibration MachinesThen there are mini lineal/upright Vibration Machines.  These can be quite useful especially for warm up and cool down before sports or going for a walk.  They can even be a good start into exercise and fitness, again it depends on the actual quality and type of machine.  You can’t generally trust the brand name of the machine as these change each week; huge runs of machines come off the production line in China and the same machines get stamped with many different names.

strength on Vibra-TrainI have little sympathy for people who get duped and buy a home Vibration Machine for a few hundred dollars believing it will be just as good as the heavy, steel platformed, high energy lineal/upright Vibration Machines that are in Vibra-Train Studios.PowerPlate Vibration Machine

Even the medium energy PowerPlate machines and FitVibe, Fit-X , and some BodyGreem machines that are found in studios, gyms, and beauty clinics are absolutely superior to the low price home models that are available on auction sites.

There are some workout quality home machines available – they cost more along with other differences and it’s essential that people do some “homework” and learn about the varying types of machines before they buy a home machine, carefully matching their needs and what results they want with the machine they choose to buy.

Expecting a $300 machine from TradeMe that is advertised with the same wording of advantages and results that accompany $20,000 Studio machines, to truely deliver those same results is a little crazy in my opinion.

One point that is made in almost all of the re-sale machines for online auction is that the seller hasn’t used the machine at all or used it only a handful of times.  Why, if it gives great results, don’t they use it? They even tell you sometimes – “I don’t have time to use it”.  This, I find laughable.  Programs for Home Vibration machines take 10 minutes or even up to 30 minutes three times a week.  For the pivotal (think Crazyfit brand or the currently advertised Gymform Vibromax) machines they tell you to stand on the machine for just 10 minutes every day.

(A little info here: make sure you are using the right program and frequency for the machine type you buy for home use)

So, the sellers of machines can’t find 10 minutes three times a week or, for pivotal machines, 10 minutes each day to use their machines so they are trying to sell them to you, telling you of all the supposed, amazing benefits you will get?

I’m going to suggest they are either

  • Very lazy, too lazy to exercise at all?
  • Involved with other exercise or sport and know that their low quality machine isn’t going to benefit them.
  • Have used the machine about ten times and realise they were lied to, that it isn’t going to give the results they want and so they are trying to sell it on to you, complete with those same lies.
  • They’ve started going to a Vibration Studio or they are using a machine at their gym and they know their cheap (well they might have paid quite a lot actually) unit is not so good as they thought when they bought it.

There are, of course, genuine sales; people moving overseas or long distance, those who really did use their machines and now have some other activity involvement, those who cannot contine for true medical reasons or pregnancy.  I hope those sellers honestly state the specifications, uses and benefits of the machine they are selling, sadly many exagerate.