Archive for the ‘Pivotal’ category

Pivotal Vibration Machines – Cardiotech CV9 versus Hypervibe Performance – An Update

March 26th, 2014

Cardiotech CV9 Pivotal Vibration Machine

 

In an older article about these two machines I wrote of the Cardiotech CV9, “The CV9 is the work-out machine. Being a new model, just onto the market this month (that was in July, 2012), it’s just a little unproven…  Cardiotech CV9 can be used for therapy/physio purposes.  This has been the main use for me” . I had a knee injury at the time and was using the CV9 for rehab to help regain movement and  strength.

hypervibe performance

 

 

 

And of the Hypervibe Performance I said, ” it’s a real work-out machine.  It really challenged me… but if you need just simple stimulation and increased circulation this machine will do that too.”

 

Now it’s time for a review and update

These two brands of high-speed, pivotal Vibration Training machines are available in Canada, U.S.A, Australia, and New Zealand (and some other countries also). Both machines are used for fitness training and/or therapy purposes and they come with an identical price tag and so which machine should you buy?

Which brand is best? Which company will provide you with the information you need for effective use? Which provides best ongoing support? What other considerations should you make?

I’ll say it now, one machine is superior – The Cardiotech CV9

Let’s have a look at each machine and at what’s provided when you buy.

Both the Hypervibe Performance and the Canadian version of CV9 (known as Complete Vibe 9) test accurate at frequencies of 6Hz to 28Hz [see notes 1 and 2] and both machines are suitable for fitness and strength training.  Both can be used for therapy, to stimulate circulation, improve balance in older or limited-mobility people, and rehabilitate after injury or illness.  Of course, you need to know how to use the machine for your intended purpose and this instruction must to be readily available in an easy to understand booklet, DVD media, or even personal training sessions. These machines are both suitable for use at home and also for therapists; beauty salons, small gyms and personal trainer studios, and even for your workplace, so knowing how to use them safely and effectively is essential. Both companies provide information.

So, why does the Cardiotech CV9, rate so much higher than the Hypervibe Performance, in my opinion?

I’ve already said both brands test true frequencies of 6Hz through 28Hz but after that so much is different. The platform of the Cardiotech CV9 is 72% larger than the Hypervibe Performance. And the CV9’s platform is accessible on all sides with the control panel column located on one corner of the machine rather than attached to the centre back of the platform.  This design removes restriction on the poses or type of exercises and that can be performed. In regular use  the CV9 is more durable and more stable than the Hypervibe Performance. Interestingly though, despite the CV9’s platform being much larger both machines have the approximately the same dimensions.

The CV9 was designed on the “shop floor” specifically taking into account its intended use – fit for the purpose.  The Hypervibe Performance is the same vibration machine that several brands sell but is modified during manufacture to improve it’s stability and performance at higher speeds for fitness training .

The Hypervibe Performance machine has a slightly higher amplitude, 11mm and higher G-force and this is used as a selling point for this brand.  The designers of the CV9 chose to stay with 10mm, the same as the original German machine that these machines are based apon.  With the large, accessible platform of the CV9, a 10mm amplitude and slightly lower G-force was found to give the user a comfortable, stable experience. The Canadian version of the CV9, the Complete Vibe 9,  has another feature to provide for user comfort, called “weight adjusted sensitivity” [see notes 1 and 2].  If the machine senses a move in the user’s position on the machine, such as a change in foot movement, it slows down for just a few seconds reducing the force that’s going to the user’s joints. The first time this happens the person might wonder if the machine has a fault so it’s important to know why this short slow down has occurred. If you are looking to buy a machine its also good to know that both are able to take high user weight, of up to 180Kg.

The materials the machines are made of differ, with the Cardiotech CV9 made with a high tensile steel frame wrapped in a gloss plastic finish. The Hypervibe is made of a mild steel with some plastic. It has been strengthened to differentiate it from other machines that come off the same mold.

Hypervibe Control Panel

Hypervibe Performance Control Panel

The control panels on the machines look very different; the Cardiotech has a smooth touch panel with choices of program plus manual control. It also has a remote control unit for use when the control panel is out of reach such as when kneeling for arm positions. The Hypervibe has a push button choice of program with an LCD display.

 

The most useful difference about the control panel is that the Cardiotech CV9 has an 8 second countdown before the machine starts.

CV9 Control Panel

Cardiotech CV9 Control Panel

This gives the user an 8 second time frame to get into perfect position on the platform before the machine motion starts. And it makes the little remote control unit superfluous so if the kids or dog run off with it or it’s confused with the TV remote and lost down the back of the couch, no worries!

A very important point is the after-sales support provided. When buying a Vibration Machine I’ve seen this range from giving some basic essentials about how to use the machine while you are still in the showroom through to supplying a fully guided program, printed instructions and pictures and/or DVD’s.  Even better is having one-on-one contact with someone who will give you information and guidance specific to your individual needs and desired results.  Sales talk is all very well; knowing who to contact after your machine arrives and you are starting to use it and need help, that’s what’s important. And what if the machine develops a fault, how do you go about getting it fixed? Will the company still be in business and does your warranty have any real worth?

Both companies promise good backup. Cardiotech, the larger company also has an association with other vibration training companies who would guide the enquirer and would “go to bat” for them in the unlikely event a warranty request was overlooked. With Hypervibe I see that there’s an email address for contact.

Hypervibe’s online product info states that they provide a User Guide, interactive CD, 2 years warranty, and 1 year physiotherapist support. They also sell for $99, a DVD course about vibration training. I wonder what you get from the DVD that is more than the freely provided training and if the information is necessary you shouldn’t have to pay extra for it, in my opinion. Cardiotech provides a 2 year labour and parts warranty, a CV9 specific comprehensive “strength and toning” user guide developed by Lloyd Shaw and endorsed by the International Vibration Training Regulatory Board (I.V.T.R.B), the same program used by commercial studios worldwide, also ongoing email support and lifetime membership to VibrationExercise.com where articles and training guides written by Dr. Jasper Sidhu can assist you with any therapy needs and teach you about vibration training in general.

In Conclusion

CV9 pict

Cardiotech CV9 – Complete Vibe 9 – Premium Speed Vibration Machine

I totally recommend the Cardiotech CV9. In my opinion this machine is fully superior in design and performance. And it’s commercial quality yet designed to look good in your home. The after sales  back-up is there, readily available for your current and future needs. And the point I made almost two years about it being “new and being a little unproven” – that’s fully negated. The CV9 I have in the studio here has performed without fault.  I know that around 5000 units have been sold and I’ve heard nothing of any design or manufacturing problems.

 

Another point, about the companies providing these machines. As I’ve been involved in this industry almost a decade now, I know and hear a lot, the good and the bad. I support the use of all types of vibration machines and I want people to learn about them and find out what type or brand is most suitable for their needs. One thing that doesn’t go down well with me and with consumers in general is when a company uses scare mongering tactics to create fear and confusion among potential buyers and clients. This is an activity Hypervibe has engaged in by giving strong warnings on its website against lineal machines. Warnings that, just a few years ago,  involved quoting a horrible, out-dated, academic study where monkeys were deliberately tortured by being strapped to a vibrating platform for up to 30 hours. This action would kill any living organism!  The accompanying picture showed a woman with a pained look on her face, her hands holding the sides of her head. Obviously this is not the controlled whole body vibration as used for workouts and/or therapy but Hypervibe used this old study and it’s sad results to suggest that brain damage or even death possibly awaited users of lineal vibration, the machines such as ones I work with every day. Pushing this nonsense, obviously in attempt to gain sales of their own brand, their action was detrimental to the entire industry, scaring people away from all vibration machines and all the good training and therapy that can be achieved with their use. Its taken a lot of education and informative articles to counter this nonsense.

For information about the Cardiotech CV9:  http://www.cardiotech.com.au/cv9/cv9-features
 
Notes:
 
1. The Cardiotech CV9 is, at the date of this article, available in two versions, with slightly differing specs. The Canadian version, known as CompleteVibe 9, has a true frequency 6Hz through 28Hz .  The Australasian version, known as CV9 has a frequency limit of 22Hz which gives the user excellent pose control (ability to maintain their position on the machine, often a squat, without feet slipping which can happen to all but the most experienced user). The Australasian version, CV9 can be built to allow the higher frequency if a buyer requests this. Conversely the Canadian model, Complete Vibe 9, can be set to the lower speed, each use is instantly programmable on the touch screen.

2.  The Canadian CompleteVibe 9 model currently has the “weight adjusted sensitivity” feature. This will soon come standard on both versions. The small “comfort” features help set the Cardiotech High-Speed Vibration machine apart from all others for strength workouts, giving it a comfortable feel alongside an intensity of muscle contraction that is matched only by commercial lineal machines.

3. My previous article that I’ve quoted from: “Two High-Speed Pivotal Vibration Machines Recommended for Home Users”

Very Important Note: I do not sell any brands of Vibration Machine. Also I do not receive commission for sales or sales recommendations. It is essential to match the buyers needs and circumstances to the right machine and so I recommend whatever machine is right for the person, from little massage/therapy pads, smal,l pivotal, therapy machines, high-speed pivotal for training (and or therapy), through to telling the enquirer that supervised training in a specialised studio or gym is the best option for them.

 

 

Two High Speed Pivotal Vibration Machines recommended for Home Users

July 18th, 2012
Gymform Vibromax Low Speed Pivotal Vibration Machine

Gymform Vibromax – Low Speed Pivotal Vibration Machine

I’m often asked about the Gymform VibroMax machine that’s advertised on TV all over the world and available at as-seen-on-tv stores in major cities. You can read my review here:

http://www.vibeplus.com/2010/09/01/gymform-vibromax-scam/

The Gymform Vibromax and the Crazyfit machines are not exercise machines, in my opinion, but they do have some good uses for therapy, such as for stimulating blood circulation, relaxation of tight leg muscles, and stress relief. Don’t buy one of these and expect to get well toned and strong muscles any time soon. When you see these machines in advertorials the models or personal trainers that are shown using the machine do this for the small amount of money they are paid. They are not honestly endorsing the product – they don’t really use it!

 

So, if you want to buy a real vibration exercise machine and you prefer a pivotal platform what machines should you look at:

 

There are currently two specific machines from two very different brands that I recommend to people who ask.  I recommend these two based on them performing true to specs, being designed to give real results and being manufactured of high quality parts. In simple language this means the machine does what it’s meant to and it doesn’t break down after a few weeks use.  The two companies that sell these are reputable (if your machine does develop a fault they will answer your phone call and provide assistance) and both have been around for some time but more of that later.

The two pivotal, vibration training machines I recommend are

1. Hypervibe  Performance   http://au.hypervibe.com/whole_body_vibration_machine.php

and

2. Cardiotech CV9     http://www.cardiotech.com.au/cv9/cv9-features

I’ve trialled the Hypervibe just a few times and it’s a real work-out machine.  It really challenged me. Don’t be worried though, if you need just simple stimulation and increased circulation this machine will do that too. It’s ideal for people who need to start off simple and later move onto more challenging training. It’s also suitable for people who are already regular exercisers and want to add vibration training to their program. The Hypervibe Performance has 4 suggested frequency specific programs from basic to more challenging plus a manual setting. You get a DVD and full User Guide plus 1 year Physio support. The Performance is a solid machine, it has a steel frame so it can take the knocks exercise equipment invariably gets. It has a large LCD display and its easy to set. There’s comfortable handlebars for support in squat positions and straps to use for upper body poses.

HYpervibe Performance Pivotal Vibration Machine

Hypervibe Performance – Premium Speed Pivotal Vibration Machine

When you’re paying up to $2,500 for a home exercise machine of any type you need to be sure there’s going to be ongoing support and repair available – you want to know there’s someone to ask for advice about using the equipment to give you the very best results and also you need to be very sure that the warrenty provided with the equipment will be honored if necessary. If you use the equipment regularly over a long time and it eventually needs adjustment or repair or just a new small part replaced, it’s important to know that the company you bought it from will still be in business and able to help.  When you buy from Hypervibe you are buying from a company that specialises in vibration machines. They’ve been part of this industry for a long time and contributed to it’s development.  In Australia the Hypervibe owner/director, Murray Seaton, travels extensively exhibiting machines at Heath and Fitness Shows, Sports Fairs, and Home Shows specifically for elderly people.  Hypervibe have representatives in many Australian States, New Zealand, Canada and USA and other parts of the world and some working studios and showrooms where you can go to try out a machine.

 

The Cardiotech CV9 is the other machine I recommend to people who want a work-out quality, pivotal vibration machine to use at their home or office.  This machine is new to the market but I’ve had access to one for almost a year.  Cardiotech also supply two other vibration machines, a very small, round model more suitable for physio use and a regular pivotal machine.

Cardiotech CV9 Pivotal Vibration Machine

Cardiotech CV9 – Premium Speed Pivotal Vibration Machine

The CV9 is the work-out machine. Being a new model, just onto the market this month, it’s just a little unproven.  Like the Hypervibe Performance, the Cardiotech CV9 can be used for therapy/physio purposes.  This has been the main use for me;  just gentle stimulation of blood circulation when I’ve been sitting at a desk for an hour or two. Simply standing on the machine for 90 seconds (set at 6Hz) and repeat once or twice is enough to get my legs comfortable again. I’ve also used this machine to help with recovery from a knee injury. The gentle stimulation relieves pain. It’s also a great de-stressor; just standing there wobbling from side to side.

But the designers and manufacturers of the CV9 would be very upset with me if I continued to tell you only about it’s therapy uses because this is a real work-out model – it has a supersized platform (larger than other brands) and it’s open on all four sides, allowing access from each without obstruction. The control support column is on one corner of the platform, it has a large, easy to set display,  and the black finish gives it a sleek, modern, space age, look.  This model would not look out of place in your lounge or the reception area of your office or business. A 10-minute toning and strength program is supplied with the machine and like the  Hypervibe, access to a Physiotherapist is available.

The CV9 was designed specificially for Cardiotech. There’s no other machine that looks alike to it or any similar models. Support and repair if it was needed is provided by the Cardiotech company, who also supply other high quality fitness equipment. They are newer to the Vibration Training industry but they are  a reputable company. I’ve been fortunate to personally meet and chat with the owners of both companies.

So which one to choose:

I advise intending buyers to try out both machines if you can, then choose the one you prefer based on your specific needs or if both seem equally good push for the best purchase deal.  Both machines specs say they will take an user weight of up to 180Kg which is an important consideration especially when compared with machines like the Gymform Vibromax which loses performance when the user is over 80Kg (or even less).

Both the Hypervibe Performance and the Cardiotech CV9 are premium speed pivotal machines. See Machine Reviews here:  http://www.vibration-training-advice.com/machine-reviews

Both are excellent quality machines for home or office use or for a personal trainer’s studio, a spa/beauty centre, or  a specialised vibration studio.  Some vibration studios have a mix of both lineal and pivotal machines and either of these two are an ideal choice for this use.  Beach Body Vibe is a studio that runs programs using only Hypervibe machines at Bondi Junction, Sydney, Australia   http://www.beachbodyvibe.com/

Note: Please check out the websites of these machines, call them up and get into a showroom to trial them.  My experience of these machines has been mostly of using the Cardiotech CV9, supplied free of charge and freighted to the studio I’m located at. I’ve appreciated this chance to use the machine myself and put my clients onto it when they would benefit. I’ve limited this to therapy use, such as improving balance and proprioception, as I have other machines available for training purposes. I’ve used the Hypervibe machine once in a studio setting, doing a full session, and once at a Sports Show. This hasn’t been enough to truely compare or note differences between the machines. I’d love the opportunity to have a Hypervibe Performance in the studio and put it through the same uses for myself and my clients as I’ve done with the CV9.  I’m hoping the Hypervibe company will supply a machine one day soon.

If you have any questions that the salespeople can’t answer feel free to contact me: details are in the Welcome Tab at top of page.

Vibration Machines – watching you wobble yourself slim?

September 2nd, 2011

Have you ever watched an advertorial or a youtube video showing a woman on a pivotal vibration machine and laughed as you watched their butt and legs wobble about from the side to side motion of the machine?

Crazy Fit Massage Machine

Low Speed Pivotal Massage Machine

I have three pivotal machines in the  studio where I work.  Two are used for therapy poses to increase blood circulation, help with relaxation, and improve proprioception in customers who because of medical or physical disability are not yet able to use the lineal Vibra-Train machines.

high speed pivotal

Premium Speed Pivotal Workout Machine

One machine is larger and is a true workout model. It’s used mainly for physio/therapy use also but can be used for full workouts. We find out customers here, when given the choice, prefer the lineal Vibra-Train platforms.

There’s also the embarrasment factor of the pivotal machines when used in a semi or deeper squat poses – the action of the side to side motion causes the user’s butt and thighs to wobble noticeably; also in some people their hips show  movement also. This is all totally normal when using this type of machine but, oh boy, does it look funny. You might have seen it in internet videos and on television where it looks amusing when the model on the machines is a tiny size 6 or 8 (N.Z. size) but can you imagine the look when a 250lb (120kg) women uses the machine? I’m asuming of course that the machine copes with this larger sized person – many pivotal machines degrade in performance well below that weight.  Even a regular sized woman, say 140lbs, doesn’t look good wobbling away on the pivotal machines. But, of course, the advertisers use attractive, tiny models to promote their products.

Jumping to their defense – vibration training isn’t about looking good in the studio while doing your work-out, it simply doesn’t matter, but the wobble is not a good look!

Another defense of the “wobble”, though completely wrong this one – I’ve had people say, “oh look at their butts wobble. They MUST be losing lots of weight!” Others come into the studio and ask if our machines are like the ones they’ve seen on TV, the ones where you wobble and get slim and fit.

Is it true – can you lightly wobble your way to a new slender you? Technically any movement burns more calories than sitting still so the person on the pivotal machine is getting some benefit from it. Many “weight-loss” books tell us to move about a lot, move legs about when sitting at the office desk and fidgit with your hands. By doing this you burn a few more calories each day and a small, measurable amount in a year. Okay, its better than being sedentary but it does very little toward the goal of  fat reduction and fitness. I’m amazed by the number of people who are confused by this.

To demonstrate the difference in machine types I put the questioning customer onto the large pivotal machine for a one minute semi-squat at low speed. Then they do the same position at a higher speed, again for a minute or two. You can see their thighs wobble and they feel this as a gentle activation. Those who want to can do the squat pose at high speed; 22hz is about the top before the users feet begin to slip on the (non-slip) plate. I then invite them to rest and then repeat the squat once or twice on a lineal machine, using the basic level 2 beginners unit. This machine gives a strong muscle contraction in the quads (front upper leg) when the person does a simple, deep (110 degree) squat for just 60 seconds.  That’s all it takes to show the very major difference in the machine types. Watching the person on the lineal machine they appear not to be moving at all, there’s none of the “wobble” but, in their own words, they tell me how much harder it is and how much deeper they feel the muscle contraction.

It’s not possible to wobble yourself slim using a pivotal vibration machine. It might be a way to start out but its not going to work for long. Wobbling fat – wobbles fat, it might give some benefit as it will mobilise fluid and improve lymphatic drainage but real toning comes from real training – and that’s impossible on almost all pivotal machines.

I’m reminded of the slogan we use when customers complain that the training program is hard work; we tell them the sign over the door says “Vibra-TRAIN” not “Vibra-MASSAGE”

Even worse than believing that by using a low speed pivotal vibration machine, you can lose weight, tone, get fit and look like the model on the advertorial on TV or internet is the promotion of simply standing upright on the machine while you watch TV.  I read an advert this week, an auction on New Zealand’s TradeMe site, where a low speed pivotal machine was being sold with the instruction to simply stand or sit on the machine and watch the pounds slip away.
IF ONLY IT WAS THAT EASY!
Only the lasiest of consumers would believe that – and as I’ve written before, they seem destined to be ripped off but that sort of marketing does a lot of harm to the whole vibration training industry.

Glossary:

Lineal
A solid platform that moves straight up and down, all across the surface at the same time.

Pivotal
A Platform that tilts from side to side , so one foot goes up , while the other goes down.

www.vibration-training-advice.com

September 28th, 2009

Remember to visit the industry’s new Vibration Training Advice Website:

www.vibration-training-advice.com

There’s articles for consumers, about studios, types of machines and exercise positions. Also lots of vibration training advice about buying a machine for home use, and a section dedicated to Instructors and Studio owners.

There’s also a discussion forum where questions can be asked to clarify what’s written in the articles or for special information needed.

HyperVibe – Premium Speed Pivotal Vibration Machines

May 13th, 2009

On a recent visit to Sydney, Australia (April, 2009), I was privileged to visit Debbie at Beach Body Vibe, Vibration Studio at Bondi Junction, near beautiful Bondi Beach.

The machines Debbie has are the HyperVibe platform. These are controlled premium speed pivotal machines. Debbie holds classes for muscle toning, weightloss, overall body workout and more. Her customers range from athletes to the elderly and she runs classes for up to 5 people or private sessions.

HyperVibe

HyperVibe Pivotal Vibration Machine (pic used with permission)

Murray Seaton, the General Manager of HyperVibe, had dared me to try out his machines as I’d previously written that Pivotal Vibration was suitable for Therapy and Light Training only. Murray told me that his machines were definitely work-out models and that he’d told Debbie to “go hard” and to give me a gruelling session.

I was still recovering from a shoulder injury and when I arrived at the studio, very tired after an early morning flight from Auckland, so I was just a little concerned. My previous experience of large pivotal machines was not at all positive as the machine had an uncontrolled rapid see-saw effect that made me feel dizzy.

I’m pleased to report that my experience was very good. HyperVibe machines run at a tested, controlled frequency of 6-28Hz and 11mm peak to peak amplitude. This means that the see-saw effect is so fast that the machine feels quite similar to pivotal/vertical vibration and, Murray, I agree, your machines definitely give a workout. I used the machine on approx 25Hz and hesitated in doing more than simple squats due to my injuries and tiredness. My friend did a more rigorous workout including single-leg squats and push-ups. Next day we both felt a little sore which was the only negative as we don’t get this from the Vibra-Train Studio vertical platforms we regularly use.  HyperVibe machines can also be purchased for home use.

Visit the HyperVibe Australia Website for more information:  www.hypervibe.com.au

or Debbie at Beach Body Vibe

Tough Guys 2

May 5th, 2009

Two other tough guys who come into the Vibra-Train City Studio and are worthy of congratulations as they work-out very hard.

The first is an elderly frail looking PriestYes, you’ve read it right. Remember Vibration Training is for everyone!

And we can also provide Vibration Therapy for those who need rehab or a less intensive workout due to injuries or health concerns.  Not so with our Priest,  he works out harder than most, only some athletes could be said to train harder.

The first time I watched over him (he loves the attention and I’m sure he fakes forgetting which position comes next) I was scared, watching this 80-something man hold good position on the machine and cunningly set the dials to 120 seconds instead of the regular 60 seconds.  He’s been given permission to do this but only on some positions and he really is very sneaky.  A real character, I now look forward to his visits.

It could be said he brings some balance to the studio as he leaves saying, “God Bless You”.  I smile as I hear Lloyd in  the background yelling at a customer, telling them to “tough it out” and telling them “God’s not going to help you”, in response to plaintive cries of “Oh God, God, this is too hard!” Hard training and maybe God’s blessing keeps our Priest very fit and strong.

Tough Guy with AttitudeThe other “tough guy” I’ve had in the studio recently was a “newbie”.  This guy’s attitude preceded him as he walked in the door.  He was, “I know it all.  I did vibration training years ago”. He told me he used to sell another brand of machines.

I warned him that Vibra-Train machines had a much stronger force than the ones he’d used and they would seem like toys in comparison as they were suitable for therapy and light training, not enough for a muscle-bound guy like him.  The first 60 second basic squat was all the  proof needed.  He changed his story, telling me actually hadn’t used the other brand machines often and although he had helped with sales, this was only weekends and it was “years ago”.  Working through the “Safety Program” and he trained hard, completely failing several times, not able to hold the positions correctly.  He loved it.  Showing him the higher level machines (the Level 3 and Level 5-Sports Model) I overlooked telling him that all Vibra-Train machines use same frequency, 43Hz, that’s not the factor controlling the “force” of the vibration as some other brands say.

A final “pull-up” position (only possible on machines with vibrating, side handle-bars) was the clincher, he paid up for a concession card right away.

I was a test dummy and I’m so excited!

January 25th, 2009

dreamstime_968714A few days ago I was privileged to try out a test machine,

a pivotal vibration machine with vibrating handlebars.

It was very smooth. Standing upright on it I didn’t felt like I was moving at all – a big plus for me as I’ve never liked the see-saw motion of pivotal machines.

And, It could be made to give more sensation by using varied frequencies.

The best part though was the Vibrating Handlebars.  I currently have nerve and muscle injury to both arms, left one is worse and I can’t lift it above my head. The vibrations from this test pivotal vibration machine felt so good in my arms awakening sensation and relieving pain.  This is not a usual feature of pivotal machines where the vibrations barely reach up to the hips when standing on the machine.

This machine would be ideal in a Physical Therapists office and, maybe one day, in Vibration Studios.

(Pic  © www.dreamstime.com)

Pivotal Vibration Therapy that works!

January 25th, 2009

My friends know how much I hate pivotal vibration machines.  You know the ones,  “As seen on TV”  crazyfit, crazyhorse, crazyvibe and just plain crazy in my opinion.  The first machine I tried was one of these and quite a good quality one.  I was impressed and saw the possibilities but I hated the sensation. It vibrated through my head – the frequency used was way too high.  It hurt my shoulders when I knelt on the floor and put my arms on the machine is a semi-pushup position.

Pulse Trainer

Pulse Trainer

The machines I use the most are lineal, Vibra-Train, machines in a Vibra-Train studio. 
There’s one good quality pivotal machine in the studio; It’s a
Pulse Trainer and I’ve been forcing myself to use it at least once a week.  If I’m going to understand pivotal vibration, to recomend it to people, then I figured I’d better learn to like it myself.  I have been pleasantly suprised  but it’s taken a few months to get used to it.  It’s just a personal thing as I just dislike the sensation and it screws with my balance.  I can now last 8 minutes out of the 10 minutes recommended standing upright on this machine.

Benefits?  Well I probably haven’t used it often enough to comment greatly but it does cause some strong sensation in the pelvic area after about 5 minutes of use.  This helps older people with walking ability – I’m not that old yet so I haven’t noticed any change *laughs*.  It has benefits for any women especially those, like me, who have had large babies and can get a little bladder leakage when coughing, laughing or running.  It’s by far more fun that all those pelvic floor exercises that Physios and Health Nurses recommend.

If you are going to use a pivotal vibration machine make sure you use one that is top quality, not a little , cheap, lightweight machine that walks across the floor with each vibration and can’t cope with user weight over 80Kg.

I recommend the Pulse Trainer machine for home use. It’s small enough to sit in the corner of the lounge and it looks good. This machine is the only one currently available that can be set to pivotal or lineal vibration by just pressing a few buttons.

Pic. used with permission.  © www.pulsetrainer.co.nz