Posts Tagged ‘Opinion’

Should Crossfit Community Clubs and Trainers join REPS NZ?

August 26th, 2014

NOTE:  This is an opinion piece based on my own experience and should be read as such.

Richard Beddie, CEO of Exercise New Zealand has been in the news lately.

He says there’s been a 35% increase in people joining exercise programs in the last five years. This is good news but he’s also been making statements about unregistered Personal Trainers; basically rubbishing them and telling the public not to trust them.

Why?  Because they haven’t taken up membership with the organisation he’s head of, Exercise NZ and REPs (New Zealand Register of Exercise Professionals).

He’s been very much getting onto CrossFit and is quoted as saying it’s been responsible for six deaths (he now says was misquoted but hasn’t provided evidence).  He calls all unregistered Trainers “cowboys”.

Again, but Why?  Because he has strongly invited CrossFit Communities (the businesses) and CrossFit Trainers to join up to REPs NZ and basically no-one has joined up.

That same invitation went out to Vibration Training Studios and Instructors, and Pilates Studios and Instructors around 10 years ago and again, no one joined up.  Yet another group not linked to Exercise New Zealand and REPs is Zoomba, although when held in a branded gym, the gym and the trainers might be registered.

What is the reason?

One of the sources of concern is New Zealand’s Accident Compensation Corporation figures that show a big increase in injuries coming from sport and exercise.  NZ’ers love of rugby and football mean these sports feature high in injury figures, followed by the high intensity workout systems of Zumba and CrossFit.

So, for Richard Beddie, the answer is simple –  all personal trainers and fitness instructors must all join up to REPs – become known as “Registered Exercise Professionals”, problem solved!  My answer is the one on the TUI billboards, “Yeah, Right!”

Caught out:

When Beddie was caught out with this statement, “CrossFit has resulted in 6 deaths overseas and rendered an Australian man paraplegic…”

none of which is true, the response from NZ Register of Exercise Professionals (REPs) was this:

“With reference to HITT activity REPs position is clear, that ALL individuals delivering this form of exercise must be registered with REPs. This ensures that the individual instructor is appropriately qualified and are bound by a scope of practise which ensures that the exercise delivered is both safe and effective. (June 18, 2014)

Is this a reasonable assumption?

Well it might sound reasonable if it ensured public safety but does that regulation really work?  REPs membership starts with the trainer having passed a course and so is assumed to have a level of competency. In practise that’s no guarantee of anything.

REPs does no checking up on the trainer!

As long as they pay the yearly fees and meet minimum requirements of working in the industry and a few points for attending the conference or short course, they stay all good and registered.

Newly qualified trainers are told – join up, pay your yearly fees and we will provide you with resources, guidelines and the yearly FitEx conference (at a reduced rate, which means nothing in my opinion as conference costs have to be met so the fee is set to meet that).

Gyms and fitness businesses are told they need to be registered (club registration) and then they may ONLY employ REPs NZ registered personal trainers and fitness instructors. There’s a form of blackmail going on there in my opinion though it’s said to be all about competency and public safety.

How do I know anything about this?

My experience was very different to what it looks like to the general public – I’m really disappointed with REPs; I got nothing out of my 5 years membership.

I work for Vibra-Train NZ, a non-registered fitness business, it’s one that will never join Exercise NZ or REPs.  My punishment for working in a non-registered business was that I paid a higher yearly fee (though no one could explain to me why).  As REPs (and what was then known as Fitness NZ) developed its membership scheme I needed to move from provisional membership to full membership.  Then they disallowed one of the academic institutes I’d studied at.

Good, I thought, someone will finally visit me at my workplace and “check” my competency. I’m very proud of what I do and welcomed a visit.

Previously I’d invited (by email) any Fitness NZ person to visit me but was told they don’t have the resource to visit.

This time I thought I’d have to prove my competency but no, again, I was refused. No one would visit.  No one from REPs seemed to care if I followed safe practises when training clients. What I was told was that instead, I just needed to pass a quick online multi-choice test.

Safe training?

So,you see,  that’s the proof of safe training REPs required – none at all!

just the certificates to say I’d passed my courses and then their online test –   but Richard Beddie is pushing the line that only REPs registered instructors are “appropriately qualified and bound by a scope of practise which ensures that the exercise delivered is both safe and effective”.

Something doesn’t add up!

And the only vibration training place that was REPs registered and employed only REPs registered trainers, was owned by an Exercise NZ staffer. The business advertised their registered status as a superiority over other studios but when I visited I was dismayed by, in my opinion, the lack of safe practise and lack of understanding the differences of vibration training to other training methods. Also I heard comments from people who changed over to train with me; there’s no way I would employ any of those REPs registered vibration training instructors.

My message to Crossfit

CROSSFIT people, don’t be bullied into joining REPs.  There’s no way that will make you better or safer trainers.  Richard Beddie thinks he can clean up Crossfit by making you all pay your fees and register.  You’ll even have to retrain if you don’t meet the registration requirements; no matter what your current experience, you’ll need that academic certificate.

Crossfit, you do have problems – I’ve watched videos showing terrible practises, certain to cause injury, and pushing people to achieve against all sense and safety.  I have clients who tell me they have done Crossfit and given up because of what they’ve seen or they have friends who have kept on despite getting injuries and then been forced to give up.

You MUST clean up your OWN methods and come down very hard on lazy or undisciplined instructors; get rid of them, they won’t change. Popularity or high advertising budget counts for nothing – get rid of any trainer or company that’s damaging Crossfit’s positive reputation.  The Vibration Training industry has done this, regulated their own; we’ve spoken out loudly against problem operators and those who promised great results but couldn’t possibly deliver as their equipment was too low quality. And we came out hard against unsafe practises.

Crossfit, it’s my opinion that REPs can’t help you do this. No one will come out and test your trainer’s competency or safe practise, or help you regulate within your own method. It seems to me that REPs is all about money, your money – you pay to call yourself registered and then you continue to pay to have your company registered and then each year you continue to pay. Only you can decide if what you get for that money is worth it to your company and your trainers. I decided, for myself, it wasn’t so I didn’t re-register a year ago – and no one from REPs even bothered to ask me why.

 

Vibration Training Anti-Cellulite Massage – Part 2

May 6th, 2013
Note: This article is written from my viewpoint as a trainer and user of high-energy, lineal vibration platforms. The results and the experiences described are not necessarily replicable on lower level machines, such as PowerPlate, FitVibe, nor on pivotal platforms of any kind.
It’s just an anti-cellulite massage – right –
how can there be a Part 2; surely its not that complicated?

Well, yes, really it is – the vibration training anti-cellulite massage is complex; its quite different to the training program, and in some studios you even pay an extra price to add it to your program.

In part 1 I’ve covered the basic process of how it works, enhancing blood flow to the backs of the legs and the butt, breaking down some of the static fat and transporting it back into the circulatory system.

So, what does this massage actually feel like?

I’m going to start by saying, we get a lot of  jibes from the wider fitness industry about vibration training; the words – vibe, vibration, and anti-cellulite massage get talked about accompanied with raucous laughter and more so when they joke about girls sitting about on  heavily vibrating platforms.  Some of these jokes are deliberately trying to discredit the fitness and strength training that we do, rather than accepting it as a valid alternative to the gym, but it’s probably fair enough to laugh about the anti-cellulite massage; after all, the ladies anti-cellulite massage means sitting on the world’s most powerful vibrators.

Woman sitting on washing machineIs it really that nice?

No, It isn’t all fun!  I said in my previous article (Part 1), the massage can be extremely irritating and it makes your legs itch so badly it’s hard to keep still. It can feel like being attacked by thousands of tickling or biting little ants. Oh Fun, maybe? Click here to read more

Vibration Training Anti-Cellulite Massage

April 18th, 2013

anti-cellulite massageThis is the one position in the IVTRB Vibration Training Safety Program that’s rather odd. It’s not training, it’s simply a massage.

Well maybe not too “simply” a massage, as we shall see.

For one thing – the anti-cellulite massage is very annoying.  It can make your butt itch so bad you hop about for ages afterwards.

Sitting on the machine, legs spread-eagled,leaning forward and resting arms over a big flat rubber mat or dangling the arms down by your ankles (which is very important to keep the backbone slightly lifted off the machine); then being pounded into the backs of the legs and parts of your butt; it isn’t necessarily a pleasant feeling.

It’s easy to picture what’s happening if you think of a big juicy piece of steak and imagine pounding it over, and over, and over with a heavy wooden (or metal) meat tenderiser.  Keep that up for three minutes and what happens to the steak? Yes, it flattens and some of the fats and other juices run off.  » Read more: Vibration Training Anti-Cellulite Massage

Vibration Training – Lloyd Shaw’s Six Year Training Results

February 6th, 2012

This post is going to be short – the picture says it all!

Lloyd Shaw Profile Feb 2012

Lloyd Shaw - Vibra-Train - February 2012


For about five years I’ve watched Lloyd Shaw follow the IVTRB Safety Program on Vibra-Train brand vibration machines – three times a week, every week. Well not quite, there’s been a few times he’s taken a break, just a week off, usually just one or two sessions. A short amount of time off any exercise training program is good, it allows the body to completely rest and still growth and gain continues.

I’ve posted a few pics of Lloyd in previous articles, Click here to see them .

Lloyd’s been following the Safety program for six years now. If you clicked through to the older pics you”ll see that Lloyd has lost size  – he no longer carries the bulk he had a year ago. This is an interesting change, he still eats burgers but I think he’s been a little more careful with food quality lately. I rarely see the pizza delivery man at the studio now. Nothing else has changed; Lloyd still eats when he’s hungry – and that’s an important point, he doesn’t overeat. He also doesn’t take supplements or steroids (never has). His protein intake is increased by a serving of pure pasteurized eggwhite (Eggcel) most days along with a few Vitamin C tablets and some Magnesium. He maintains a healthy gut and elimination with a spoonful of a fibre mix.

And this is the result, a slimmer, healthy body, with excellent muscle definition. Body Composition Analysis Machine test results put Lloyd in the highest category for muscle quality. His body fat level absolutely normal, right on the line.

When I think of the owners and marketers of many of the well known vibration machine brands I sometimes wonder what sort of results they are personally getting – from vibration training alone (its the only exercise Lloyd Shaw does).

I could name many who are young to mid aged guys. My challenge is – show us what you’ve got, show us a picture and tell us your program.

Lloyd Shaw’s program – click through to YouTube

Vibration Training Or Death – your choice

June 29th, 2011

Okay, the first thing readers are going to tell me is that my title is very serious – it’s meant to be!

Will you die if you don’t do vibration training? Maybe you won’t but there’s a very high risk of premature death for certain groups of people who refuse to partake in strength producing exercise; and vibration training is the safest and most effective form of fitness training I know of. In fact there are only a few conditions where vibration training isn’t recommended.

Who are the people who would benefit so much and what happens if they refuse or, the much more common scenario, they start training (or therapy using the machines if that’s their starting point) and then they stop – for all sorts of reasons with laziness (just can’t be bothered) being the prime one.

slim shaped girl jumpingOkay, you don’t fit into this category if you are young, active, fit, of healthy weight, and maybe also if you are middle aged and go to a gym regularly (though vibration training on top of a gym session is the extreme that gives amazing results).  It’s not for you also if you are pregnant (as a precaution at this stage, we don’t allow it), if you have a pacemaker (but we haven’t forgotten you; there are small vibrating foot platforms available), or if you have an active cancer (even this contra-indication is being debated).

This leaves a huge population that CAN use a vibration machine and if they aren’t active in some other fitness method, they will benefit greatly if they do.

That’s the nice message – the harder more serious one is this

People who have a disability and can’t easily do other forms of exercise; people who are morbidly obese (considered to be around 40% BMI) and can’t even walk to the letterbox without pain in their knees or hips, or gasping for breath, those who have muscular dystrophy or M.S. and even older people who are sedate – these people benefit so much from Vibration Training or Vibration Therapy.  And I almost forgot to add; those who have diabetes or pre-diabetes which goes hand-in-hand with obesity and has become the Number 1 health problem in New Zealand.  These are the people my hard hitting title really applies to – Do it or Die!

The Joys and the Problems

At Vibra-Train we allow some people to be sponsored and do their sessions free. These are people with true life threatening conditions (very extreme obesity is one) or a major disability they are never going to recover from.  Coming in for free isn’t automatic – it’s done after discussion and generally with the support of their medical helpers (doctors etc). It’s certainly not given to everyone who thinks they’re a little overweight. Some of the people who are given this sponsorship have been in a severe health situation for a long time and don’t have the finances to pay for sessions so this is a wonderful gift that Vibra-Train gives them – and more so as the sponsors are the directors and staff; there’s no outside organisation that pays for this in New Zealand.

These people (the morbidly obese, those with M.S., in wheelchairs, and similar) work hard, some starting out with just a single handlebar assisted squat position. This can mean driving or being driven across the city to do just one single, 60 second position on the machine.  Those who are not able to do even that sit in front of the machine with their feet placed on the platform edge for 3 minutes, repeated once or twice.  Starting with just that one squat, or sitting in front of the machine with feet on edge, the client graduates slowly  into more squats and when they are able we add in a few more positions building up to the full program for some; others do what they can.

The results are truly amazing – they are life saving! I see people who can only walk with a cane or stoop and shuffle begin to stand upright and walk with confidence knowing their legs are stronger and will support them.  Within three or four weeks I’ve seen hugely obese clients gain strength and then start to slim down. It’s a slow change and no one becomes slim overnight despite what advertising for various pills and plans tells us but it is real and its forever if the person keeps training. Their whole demeanour changes, they tell me how much they look forward to coming in for their sessions. It’s very hard work doing the vibration training but that part is no different than it is for other clients – all real training is hard work.

The great thing about using the Vibra-Train brand of machines is that the sessions are fully supervised and the machines are very powerful but designed specifically for use by people who cannot squat unaided what we call “worst case scenario”.

I work with some of the sponsored clients and enjoy encouraging and pushing them as hard as they are able, and some more above that. We get real results from real training in a safe controlled environment.

What happens next is very sad

Sometimes it’s frustration because there’s no instant fix or miracle, sometimes its family pressure, sometimes laziness but there are some clients, some sponsored even, who stop coming after a few months. It happens at any time, even after we’ve marvelled at their results.  They know Vibration Training is working for them yet they stop coming. We usually don’t know why people have stopped – we wonder if they are unwell or moved to another city.  Then they come back – many months later, always so much worse in their condition, and they expect us to fix them.  Ask where they’ve been and they’ve been “too busy” or gone off to try a “magic cure” or just stopped for no real reason.  After the effort the trainers here put in and the effort they used to make, they stopped coming and think they come back and recover, get back on track again. This might be possible but often it isn’t!   Debilitating conditions get worse over time so we’re starting over at a huge disadvantage since their previous time.  We’ve had people come back in a wheelchair where before they could walk in. There are times we simply can’t help anymore!

Title of this article; “Vibration Training or Death?” The choice is serious so choose well.

Vibration Machines – Internet Articles

September 20th, 2010

Crazy Fit Massage MachineType “Vibration Machine” or “Vibration Training” into Google and you’ll find an abundance of articles, equipment sellers, equipment manufacturers, fitness centres, specialised Vibration Training Studios and more.

You’ll find some articles with excellent information for people wanting to train in a studio or to buy a machine for home use but you’ll also read many artices that are thinly veiled, often poorly worded informational advertisements with click-throughs that take you to sites that sell cheap, home machines.

These articles are easy to spot, once you’ve read a few of them, as they promote a particular brand of machine and the same article, word-for-word, often appears on many internet sites at the same time.  Even worse, the authors sometimes go by more than one name, so you will find the same, word-for-word, article on different websites, written by Jessica Watson, Jessica Whatson, Shilipi Sharma, and Sanjana Sharma. These are all the same author writing paid articles to promote HyperVibe machines.

If a search engine, like Google, finds many articles about a brand, product or service, that brand’s website goes up in the rankings, (the ideal being to show on Page 1 of a search for that product) and so it gets even more hits and the brand is thus, promoted.  Most articles also contain “click throughs” – links to the promoted company or brand’s real website.

If you use Google again and type in the actual brand name of the machine promoted in the advertorial articles you’ll sometimes find other articles exposing the particular brand; sometimes an opinion on the marketing pratices (as in the example of multi-writers above).

Other times (not related to the paragraphs above) it’s the brand of machine advertised and promoted as the best machine available” or the “only one that does what it does, that others within the vibration training industry take “offense” at. These advertising terms are very common but when attached to low price, low quality brands, they have caused intending buyers to give up and look for other fitness products instead. We know that advertising hyperbole is the norm but I believe more care needs to be taken when advertising a health and fitness product.

I recommend people check out the Vibration-Training-Advice.com website for articles that tell the truth plus a review of machine types and what they can be used for.

My website also exists to educate and, like this article, expose scams and frauds that are, in my opinion, harmful to consumers.

There’s just one problem -

some people seem destined to be “ripped-off”.  They read the articles exposing lowQuestion Mark quality machines, go to the machine review page (I presume as it’s often listed in articles plus it appears in bold on the Vibration-Training-advice website), yet they ask non-sensical questions.  Those of us writing the help articles get emails or questions on forums asking the price or where to buy a low quality machine we’ve just given a bad review to or written an explanatory article about.  You have to wonder if people really do read the articles or if they presume every brand you write about must be the machine that will give the results they’re looking for.

After two articles exposing the Gymform VibroMax scam and telling readers the real uses of that machine I got the question, “how much do you sell the VibroMax for?”

Let’s make it simple – at this point in time, I do not sell Vibration Machines and If I ever did sell the Gymform VibroMax I’d sell it for a true price (not the exaggerated prices I’ve seen on the TV Infomercials that use models and trainers to promote the machine) and I’d sell it for it’s true use, which in my opinion, definitely isn’t fitness training.

Unethical TradeMe Seller reacts to the truth

May 31st, 2010

A week ago I wrote a series of articles about sellers of Vibration Machines on TradeMe, a New Zealand online auction site, similar to Ebay.  I wrote about fitness product importers who sold new machines, usually low energy, pivotal vibration massage units and also about regular re-sellers of used machines.

One of the sellers of low energy, cheap to manufacture, machines has banned me. That means I can’t ask any questions on his auctions or give any reply when he misleads potential buyers by his auction wording or in replies to questions asked.

This seller trades on TradeMe as Fitness Hire Ltd or razzel1 and they use the brand name SiTrek Vibration Trainer. They say its one of the most sold vibration machines in the world.  This is true, it’s the well know, CrazyFit Massager. Read a little about them: Click here

Crazy Fit Massage MachineI wrote of how this auction seller of new cheaply made, low energy, pivotal machines advertised them in a manner that made them sound equal to high force Studio platforms and even said, ” don’t waste your money going to a studio”.  They say that for benefits equal to working out for an hour at the gym all you need to do is STAND on the machine while you watch TV or listen to music”.  Then you’ll get increased circulation (that’s partially true), increased metabolism and burn more calories both during your time on the machine and after. Well that last part is a big stretch, I can’t say it’s totally untrue but really? increased metabolism after standing (that’s standing not performing any exercise positions) on a machine that moves you up and down, slightly see-saw style about 12 times a second? Maybe if you weigh over 400 pounds it might be a helpful start to movement.

I’ve tried it!  On one machine I got bored, on another that had faster and very random sideways movement as well and the see-saw up/down I got sea-sick.  To someone unaccustomed to exercise or vibration machines It can feel, well, like movement, so it is possible to get a good sensation and a belief that, yes, this machine is going to make you fit and strong. This is how so many people are happy enough to buy this type of machine.

It really can feel exciting. After all, it was one of these low energy pivotal machines that I first tried and decided it was, 1. dangerous (it was a bigger, faster, uncontrolled movement, pivotal machine), 2. soothing to painful shoulders when I knelt and put my hands on the platform so I pondered its value for massage and healing, 3. exciting enough to make me investigate more about other uses opf Vibration and other types of machines.  I thought it had “potential” but that, something was very wrong with the design of the machine I tried.

The rest is, as they say, history! I am now one of the most prolific advocates for high quality Vibration Training and Vibration Therapy.  I’ve seen what it can do and the proven benefits in my life and so many others.  I’ve written many published articles and debated with people worldwide on the topics of machine types, quality, benefits and more.

There’s no way I am going to stand aside and watch as unethical traders use whatever advertising words they choose and attach the benefits of high energy, high quality machines to the auction details for their plastic, low everything, machines.  I’ve said many times that some of these low force, pivotal machines can have benefits for some people; massage value to the legs, slightly increased circulation and very slightly increased metabolism in overweight, very unfit or unwell, or those who do no exercise at all.  The degree of benefit depends mostly on the machine but also on the needs of the user. 

There is no way a person can build muscle and get the physiche of the people shown on infomercials or in pictures attached to these machines just by standing on one, ten minutes a day, or even by following the supplied exercise chart.  Heck, I couldn’t even get into some of the yoga style poses that are shown on some of the exercise charts but I’ll grant that performing the poses on or off the cheap, low energy pivotal machine might increase one’s flexibility (and you don’t need the machine for that).

I’ll continue to warn about the rip-off’s of the Vibration Training Industry and equally importantly, I’ll continue to promote the use and benefits of good quality machines, of varying brands and types. Banning me from questioning an auction’s details gives me greater reason to suspect the seller of being knowingly dishonest and unethical and I’ll yell loudly against that every time.

Note: This blog post is my personal opinion. All buyers of Vibration Machines by auction, in stores, from or as-seen-on-tv sellers are advised to seek advice, use Google, and make their own educated decisions.

Selling Vibration Machines – So many dishonest re-sellers

May 19th, 2010

I’ve been thinking over my last post and also told a few people what I’d written.  Their replies tell me I have been too kind, too polite in what I’ve written.

Talking about buyers the comments have included:

  • So many people buy low energy home Vibration Machines thinking they are going to get really fit and strong, lose weight, gain muscle and get the look of a model, all by standing on the jiggly machine 10 minutes a day.
  • Lazy people wanting a quick fix believe what the infomercials that tell them, that no effort is required, just stand on the machine while watching T.V.  it’s so easy.  They are so gulliable that they believe that the model or personal trainer shown in the infomercial got to look so good just because they use that machine.
  • Some people do try harder to buy a machine that will give them results.  They might even get some benefit from their machine at first because they follow a program carefully but only a few weeks later they plateau and stop making gains.

Then what do these people do when they realise their cheap (or sometimes not so cheap), low quality machines are not going to give them the results they’d hoped for?

Many, and I’m tempted to say Most, sell them on – using the same dishonest advertising that tempted them to buy in the first place.  By this time they know it’s not the truth but hey, they were conned or maybe too lazy to really check out what they were buying, and now they want as much of their money back as possible.

I can’t understand how people can do this;  how so many can lie so easily.  Maybe online auctions make the whole sales process seem remote and selling to someone you don’t know somehow lets people feel okay about being dishonest but really, if you have been conned, how can you turn around so easily and con someone else?

And to the question: have I ever bought or sold a Vibration Machine on an online auction site?

Yes, I have. I bought a small DKN lineal vibration machine when I was learning about machine types and force. I wanted to see how well it worked for home use and just what could be achieved with it.  I knew what I was buying and only paid $NZ150, a reasonable price.  The seller was honest in the auction saying it had been bought for her father but as he was a fit, muscular man who enjoyed sailing; the machine was simply too low powered and also the platform was too small for him so they had bought a much larger medium force machine.  They warned me that the machine was low force.

I played with the little DKN machine for a few months putting myself, family and friends through the Vibra-Train safety program; as much as one can do with such a small, low to the ground machine.  I even bought a foam mat to use on the platform when hands or elbows were in contact with the spikey surface.  The machine had very limited use for my famly as we use Vibra-Train machines in the studio so we soon tired with it.  It’s only real use was for my husband to warm up before going for a 10 mile winter run and for this he found it okay.  So I on-sold it, again on an internet auction site, with honest wording, of course and I showed the buyer how to use it.  It was adequate for the buyer’s needs; useful  for gentle muscle stimulation and increased blood supply.

And, it’s really not so hard to be honest.

Serious Problems of Ideal Body Weight Formulas

February 16th, 2010

I’m back on track this month with regular workouts and following a well designed eating plan.  I have a goal weight in mind but when I looked back over the personalised plan I’m following I was horrified at the goal weight set for me:  52-70kg.

There’s a wide variation in those figures and at first glance it looks reasonable.  Many women would simply accept the goal, go hard-out in diet and exercise toward the lowest figure and then cry when they fail to reach the target.  Continued food deprivation and yo-yo diets can lead to morbid obesity and so worsen the situation the hapless person finds himself in.

So what’s wrong with that goal?

Simply, it fails to take into account ethnicity and muscle mass amongst other factors.  For me an eventual goal weight of 68-72 is attainable and healthy (and that’s the upper limit of the plan I am following).  The lower limit of 52kg is just too low and could deplete my muscle mass to a point where my bone density would lower putting me at risk of osteoporosis or easily breaking bones.  My metabolic rate would fall and with that my energy level and mental acuity.

My Personalised Eating Plan

The diet and exercise plan I’m using as a guide to plan my eating this year was written specifically for me by a highly respected nutritionist whose advice and articles I value.  It was based on my age, sex, height, weight, waist measurement, and my opinion of my body type which I entered as “muscular”.   The results that came back were fairy accurate compared with the results I get from the Body Composition Analyser machine at Vibra-Train where I work.  The estimated metabolic rate was lower than my actual rate but the BMI measurement was correct. (Note: BMI is another outdated measurement that fails in usefulness because off ethnicity and muscle mass differences).  The report said I am Obese based on my BMI (Body Mass Index).  It then gave dire warnings of health problems that accompany obesity.  These would be enough to scare anyone into eating better and exercising regularly and so are good for people to read although in my case, again they are overstated as my BMI does not reflect my real state.  I know my actual muscle mass percentage from the Body Composition Analyser machine and as it’s high it skews my BMI.

In a personalised diet plan where does the goal weight come from?

Many websites give “Ideal Body Weight” using arithmetic formula that was designed for medicine dosing, (NOT for weight control).  One such formula is that of Dr BJ Devine who in 1974 converted a formula already in use based on inches of height and pounds of bodyweight into metric figures.  It gives ideal (or expected) bodyweight as

Men: Ideal Body Weight (in kilograms) = 50 + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet.
Women: Ideal Body Weight (in kilograms) = 45.5 + 2.3 kg per inch over 5 feet.

These figures suggest a Body Mass Index of about 23 for adult men (this is rather high) and for adult women of 20.8 which for many women is too low and suggest an ideal body weight for most women seriously close to lean body weight (organs, bone, muscle, with no fat).

Although Devine’s formula was updated in 1983 by Dr JD Robinson and DR DM Miller, their formulas still have serious faults.  And even before the Devine IBW formula the insurance company, Metropolitan Life was, in 1943, using medical dosing weight formula to set height/weight tables.

The flaws in these formulas when used for Ideal or Best Body Weight are just too high to be used today.  Years ago on a battlefield or in a hospital when a person’s weight had to be calculated immediately to give dosage of life-saving medications (like theophylline, digoxin, gentomyin) these estimations or expected weight were invaluable but not so today.

What is your Real Ideal Weight?

My advice to women (and men) wanting to know their true ideal body weight is to be very wary of online formula and even ranges on a diet plan made for you.  Your ideal weight is the one at which you are feel well and are active. It’s the weight at which you feel at your best! You know what this is and a quick glance in the mirror shows if you are carrying muscle or fat.  A test using a Body Composition Analyser (a machine that uses a light electric current to take measurements) can be helpful as it gives a printout of your measurements including Body Fat Percentage and Muscle Mass Percentage and an overall fitness score, a starting point to work from and then a repeat test three – five months later to show your progress.  In Auckland Central there is a BCA machine at Vibra-Train, in Victoria St West.

My other writings

May 20th, 2009

Recently I’ve written two articles that have been published on a big online magazine blog site.  The first is about the amazing competition results acheived by Teneka Hyndman after adding Vibration Training to her already gruelling training regime:

http://blogcritics.org/scitech/article/taking-it-to-the-next-level/

The second article tells of the fabulous results Vibration Training plus diet control can have on reducing visceral (belly) fat and overall weightloss:

http://blogcritics.org/scitech/article/study-shows-vibration-training-to-be/

Please read these articles and make comments on the blogritics site.